Karin PUTSCH-GRASSI


_98A6200 x sasama 2017 _KM60343 x sasama 2017 _79A8826 x sasama 2017 20150516_154833 12 x sasama 2017 (2)

Name: Karin PUTSCH-GRASSI

Country: Italy

HP: click

Biography/ 略歴

Karin Putsch-Grassi was born in Germany in 1960. She did her apprenticeship in Albrecht Kiedaisch’s Ceramics studio in Tübingen. In 1982 she went to Florence, where she earned a “Maestro d’Arte” diploma at the “Istituto d’Arte” under the ceramicists Salvatore and Stefano Cipolla.

She realised her first ceramics in her own studio, where she experimented with local clays, glazes and firings. To this end, she built various wood-burning kilns that were always more sophisticated in their structure and dimensions. After attending several workshops given by John Colbeck, in 1989 she moved to London for a year and took a diploma in ceramic art at the Goldsmiths’ College. She then moved back to Tuscany, where the birth of her three children inspired her to undertake an enthusiastic teaching career.

She has participated in various seminars all over Europe, where she has been able to explore always more innovative techniques under the Master Ceramicists Takeshi Yasuda, Ruthanne Tudball, Wally Keeler, and Daphene Corregan.

Karin Putsch-Grassi’s works have been displayed at numerous exhibitions and museums throughout Europe. Moreover, they have also found a highly-appreciated place in private collections.

Artist Statement/ アーティストステイトメント

In  thirty years of experience in the field of ceramics, my technique has evolved incessantly, always stimulated by the strong connection with ceramics itself, as well as by an enthusiasm for experimenting with new techniques and clays, and with a continual search for challenges.

Most recently, I have perfected the technique named by myself as “CUT & STRETCH”. It consists of making incisions in the soft clay surface of the ceramic work, which is subsequently pulled, lengthened or even widened until it creates uncontrollable clefts and fissures which are produced by the non-uniform thickness and by the consistency of the clay. The surface shows the traces of the work progress, and it is the firing of the piece that establishes this special moment.

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